Identifying The Major Hazards In The Construction Site

Posted by on Sep 13, 2016 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

The construction site is one of the most dangerous places for a worker to be in. While they account for only 6 percent of the American workforce, the industry accounts for more than 20 percent of all job-related fatalities. As the website of this Houston Personal Injury Lawyer reveals, it is important for construction sites to be excellently managed to keep dangerous conditions from arising. Here are the top four hazards in the construction site:

Fall Hazards

According to statistics compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Occupational Safety & Health Administration, fall hazards account for 36% of construction worker deaths in 2012. They include scaffoldings, ladders, and roofs. Employers should put in place fall protection policies and should have the necessary equipment that will keep workers from falling. The employees should also be trained on evaluating and identifying fall hazards.

Struck-by Hazards

Struck-by hazards account for 10% of construction worker deaths. Most of the fatalities involve heavy equipment and 1-in-4 struck-by vehicle deaths involve construction workers. To prevent fatalities, employers should set-up barricades and warning signs as well as assign spotters and flaggers when working in roadways and there is continuous traffic.

Electrical Hazards

The data compiled by BLS and OSHA revealed that 9% of construction worker deaths in 2012 were from electrocution. Power lines, live circuits, power cords, and power tools can expose workers to injuries and even death. Employers should put in place precautionary measures in order to prevent electrical hazards from injuring construction workers.

Caught-in Between Hazards

Two percent of fatalities in the construction site were due to being caught between objects. Caught-in between hazards may include excavations and trenches. These hazards can collapse and trap workers who are working in these sites. It is important for workers to comply with safety standards and use protective gear.

Known as the “Fatal Four,” these construction site hazards claim lives of workers on a yearly basis. By eliminating these hazards, 435 construction workers can be saved every year.

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