Scanning for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

Posted by on May 24, 2016 in Health | 0 comments

A new brain scan, which is conducted via a new generation of radioactive pharmaceuticals, is considered a one-step forward by researchers when it comes to diagnosing and categorizing a brain illness that has tormented many American football players for many years now.

This brain scan, which is recently done by researchers at Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, shows that a 39-year-old living former National Football League football player is suffering from psychiatric symptoms consistent with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, an illness that has also been the bane of late football players Michael Lewis “Mike” Webster and Tiaina Baul “Junior” Seau, Jr.

Said 39-year-old former football player has had suffered from a number of concussions during his playing years, researchers, who include Samuel Gandy and Dara Dickstein of Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, said. These researchers use cutting-edge ligands, or substances that bind to receptors and are able to be seen via brain imaging, to examine the brains of living athletes at risk of incurring CTE, who include NFL and National Hockey League players.

In line with the Mount Sinai researchers’ goals, Robert Stern of Boston University, who also want to speed up the process of diagnosing CTE in living people, said he, along with the Mount Sinai researchers, is using a new ligand called T807, which is not yet approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and has been used in human testing only in 2014.

Stern, who says the primary goal is to diagnose the CTE in an athlete before the illness can spread all throughout the person’s brain and therefore prevent the illness from escalating to an early death for the player, is being funded by grants from the Department of Defense and National Institutes of Health.

The website of Crowe & Mulvey, LLP says that mild traumatic brain injuries can cause temporary disfunctioning in brain cells, whereas major traumatic brain injuries, such as CTE can cause torn tissues and bleeding in the brain that when not addressed promptly can cause conditions that may lead to death.

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