Types of Mail Fraud

Posted by on Feb 13, 2017 in White Collar Crime | 0 comments

The use of the U.S. Mail system to deceive another person for personal gain is known as mail fraud. As with any white collar crime, mail fraud is a serious charge. According to Cazayoux Ewing Law Firm, if charges of mail fraud are brought against a person, then there is a good chance that this person has already been under investigation for a pretty significant period of time. The U.S. Postal Inspectors are in charge of investigating any crime in which the U.S. Mail system is used. This organization, sometimes with the assistance of other government agencies, is in charge of seeking legal action against the accused. The U.S. Postal Inspection Service writes that “Postal Inspectors may seek prospective or administrative action against the violator,” meaning that charges of mail fraud can be a serious accusation.

The U.S. Postal Service can itself be incorporated into the scam. This instance of mail fraud involves falsely posting a job offer to work for the postal service by putting a notification in the mail, a newspaper, or another public place. Once contacted, the person issuing the false advertisement will often ask for a fee in order for you to receive information about the position. Another common fraud is a fake service offering training in order to help you pass a required Postal Service examination that must be taken before employment. Additionally, these advertisements can promise that applicants will be placed on a special list from which new hires are selected.

Another type of mail fraud originates from a commercial enterprise. The guidelines detailed in the Deceptive Mail Prevention and Enforcement Act outline the specifics of this type of mail fraud. Mailings that offer some form of sweepstakes must clearly display the rules of the contest. Additionally, the mailing must inform the entrant that no purchase is necessary to enter the contest and that a purchase doesn’t improve the chance of winning the contest. An important part of the sweepstakes posting is the inclusion of a contact for the mailer. The posting must include an address for the principal place of business of the mailer or some other way of contacting the mailer. If these requirements are not met, then the sweepstakes offer is considered mail fraud.

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